The aim of the conference was to organize a post-war peace that was not only a collective security order, but also a plan to give the liberated peoples of post-Nazi Europe self-determination. The meeting should focus on the restoration of the nations of war-torn Europe. But within a few years, as the Cold War divided the continent, Yalta became the subject of intense controversy. The French head of state, General Charles de Gaulle, was not invited to the Yalta conference or to the Potsdam conference, a small diplomat who aroused deep and persistent resentment. [5] De Gaulle attributed his exclusion from Yalta to Roosevelt`s long-standing personal antagonism against him, although the Soviet Union also refused his admission as a full participant. But the absence of a French representation in Yalta also meant that De Gaulle`s invitation to the Potsdam conference would have been very problematic. It would then have felt honourable to insist on the need to reopen all the issues agreed upon in Yalta in his absence. [6] The Yalta Conference, also known as the Crimean Conference and codenamed Argonaut, took place from 4 to 11 February 1945 and was the meeting of the heads of government of the United States, the United Kingdom and the Soviet Union during World War II to discuss the reorganization of Germany and Europe after the war. The three states were represented by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Prime Minister Joseph Stalin.

The conference took place near Yalta in Crimea, Soviet Union, in the Livadia, Yusupov and Vorontsov palaces. The Declaration of Liberated Europe was launched by Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin at the Yalta Conference. It is a promise that will enable European citizens to “create the democratic institutions of their choice.” The declaration says: “The fastest possible implementation by free elections” that respond to the will of the people. This is similar to the statements of the Atlantic Charter, in which it says “the right of all men to choose the form of government under which they will live.” [12] The initiative to convene a second “Big Three” conference came from Roosevelt, who had hoped for a meeting before the US presidential elections of November 1944, but later pushed for a meeting in early 1945 at a neutral location in the Mediterranean. Malta, Cyprus and Athens have been proposed. Stalin, who insisted that his doctors oppose long journeys, rejected these options. [7] Instead, he suggested meeting instead in the Black Sea city of Yalta in Crimea. Fear of Stalin`s plane also contributed to this decision.

[8] Yet Stalin formally referred to Roosevelt as the “host” of the conference; All plenary sessions should take place in the American accommodation of the Livadia Palace, and Roosevelt, without exception, sits in the center of the group photos (all taken by Roosevelt`s official photographer). The agreement calls on the signatories to “deliberate together on the measures necessary to fulfil the common responsibilities defined in this declaration.” During the discussions on Yalta, Molotov added language that weakens the implication of the application of the declaration. [19] At the time of the Yalta conference, the armed forces of western France and Belgium had been liberated and fought on Germany`s western border. To the east, Soviet troops were 65 km from Berlin, having already repelled the Germans from Poland, Romania and Bulgaria. There were no more questions about the German defeat. It was the new form of post-war Europe. [2] [3] [4] Churchill defended his action in Yalta during a three-day parliamentary debate that began on 27 February and ended with a vote of confidence. During the debate, many MPs criticized Churchill and expressed deep reservations about Yalta and his support for Poland, 25 of whom drafted an amendment to protest the agreement. [22] The three heads of state and government ratified the european advisory commission`s agreement that set the limits of post-war zones of occupation for Germany: three